New Work

Holding the Center

If ekphrastic writing describes visual art in words, this ceramic piece could be called ekmorphic. It gives form to the words in Jeffery Beam’s poem, “Dame Kind.”

The wideness of things amazes.
Not the quantity
but how objects expand & heave
with the regularity
of lungs. The shimmering
chinks
holding the center.

The poem repeats twice on the vessel, spiraling down from the top and up from the bottom. They end on opposite sides, in the middle, literally “holding the center”.

Holding the Center

Pause. . .Now Go

This piece gives form to a poem, “Pause,” by Jeffery Beam. (I’ve changed his words in the first line, from “before you turn the page” to “before you turn around.” The poem repeats 10 times diagonally on the surface, ending at the top, near the small opening, with “Now go”. It invites the viewer to interact with the piece, either by going inside, to the mysterious interior, or turning around and walking away.

Pause

before you turn around
Pause with me …
There
That’s it
The ancient place
The now place
Now go …
Pause. . .Now Go

A Journey to the Ocean Inside (2)

This phrase repeats on a diagonal around this piece, but the diagonal lines are staggered. One line repeats the phrase twice. The next one starts with “Inside” and then continues, “A Journey to the Ocean Inside-A Journey to the Ocean.” So at the top, if you follow around the opening it says, “Ocean Inside Ocean Inside Ocean Inside, etc.” In the gallery section there is another piece like this but smaller. It was the first one that I made with this phrase. To get this depth in the relief I have used the same techniques demonstrated in the video in the “Artist’s Statement” section, but each letter is moved in or out from the wall of the thrown form. This piece has platinum luster on the letters at the top, decreasing as they go down the side.

A Journey to the Ocean Inside (2)

Flight of the Hamsa

This large construction is another version of an idea I’ve developed in several earlier pieces. For a conceptual description of this piece, see “He Becomes an Angel”,  in the “Highlighted Pieces” section. The word hamsa in Hindu lore is understood to refer to a crane or goose, and is a symbol of liberation from the cycle of birth and death. The hamsa is also the vehicle of the Goddess Saraswati.

 

 

Flight of the Hamsa
Autumnal Equinox

Journey to the Source 2

This is the second piece I’ve made using this design. The first was much smaller and was made as a receptacle for my father’s cremations. Can you see the fish shapes? I’m originally from the Pacific Northwest, where the migratory runs of salmon and steelhead are so much a part of the traditional folklore as well as part of the outdoor culture of today.

Journey to the Source 2

Refracted Journeys 1 (front)

This is the first in what I hope will be an installation of 25 to 30 pieces. For a short description of the project see my blog article from October 29. Each piece will have simple portrait photographs of the front, both sides, and the back of anonymous participants’ heads.

Refracted Journeys 1 (front)
Refracted Journeys 1 (left side)